By Dental Choice
March 15, 2022
Category: Cosmetic Dentistry
Tags: Crowns and Bridges  

Discover the benefits of getting dental crowns and bridges for your smile.

Accidents happen! Yes, even to your smile. Whether you are dealing with extensive decay, or a cracked or broken tooth, Dr. Irving Phillips and Dr. Wade Dressler at Dental Choice in Easton, MD, are here to tell you how getting dental crowns and bridges could turn your smile around.

What are crowns and bridges?

These fixed dental restorations are custom-made just for you. A crown is a tooth-shaped cap that is placed over a tooth to improve its function and appearance while a dental bridge is used to fill gaps and replace one or more missing teeth.

Why might I get a crown?

A crown is a very versatile restoration that can be used to protect a tooth from further damage. A tooth weakened by decay, infection, or trauma can often benefit from getting a crown. A crown will surround the tooth and provide a stronger and more durable outer layer of protection.

A crown may be recommended if you have a cracked, fractured, or broken tooth, if you have a tooth that is badly misshapen or discolored, or if you just underwent root canal therapy.

When are dental bridges needed?

A dental bridge is a fixed oral prosthetic that is designed to replace a single missing tooth or a few missing teeth in a row. A bridge uses two dental crowns, which are placed over healthy teeth on both sides of the gap. The bridge, which contains false teeth, will be fused with the crowns to anchor the artificial teeth in the middle.

Dental crowns and bridges offer an array of benefits, from treating tooth loss and filling gaps left behind by missing teeth, to protecting teeth from further damage and improving the aesthetics of your smile. 

Do you want to know more about dental crowns, bridges, and other restorative dentistry options we offer? If so, all you have to do is call Dr. Irving Phillips and Dr. Wade Dressler at Dental Choice in Easton, MD. You can reach our office at 410-822-4310.

Don't hide your smile, improve it! Cosmetic dentistry in Easton, MD, can help give you the confidence to smile again. Dr. Irving Phillips and Dr. Wade Dressler of Dental Choice offer a variety of cosmetic treatments for all your dental needs.

Teeth Whitening

The first thing that most people who want to improve their smile think about is teeth whitening. Regular brushing keeps your teeth healthy, but for a truly bright white smile, you should consider professional whitening. In-office whitening only takes an hour and brightens your smile by up to eight shades.

Bonding

If you have chipped or cracked teeth your dentist may recommend this treatment. Using a dental bonding material, your dentist will fill and reshape your damaged teeth. 

Dental Veneers

Veneers are another alternative to enhance your smile, provided by your cosmetic dentist in Easton, MD. They are thin shells that cover the front surface of your teeth to cover imperfections and give you a perfect smile.

Dental Implants

If you have one or more teeth that can't be repaired with bonding or veneers or have a gap in your smile, dental implants are an excellent option because they can replace one or more teeth. Titanium posts are affixed to the patient's jaw and it is on these that the replacement crown is bonded, making for a very long-lasting addition to your smile.

Your dentist can find the best combination of cosmetic treatments specifically for you.

Don't Delay

If you are interested in cosmetic dentistry treatments in Easton, MD, please give Dr. Phillips and Dr. Dressler of Dental Choice a call today at (410) 822-4310. 

 

By Dental Choice
February 09, 2022
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
4RiskAreasThatCouldAffectYourLong-termOralHealth

Good oral health doesn't just happen. It is often the byproduct of a long-term care plan developed by a patient with their dentist. The plan's strategy is simple—stay well ahead of any potential threats to teeth and gum health through prevention and early treatment.

We can categorize these potential threats into 4 different areas of risk. By first assessing the state of your current oral health in relation to these areas, we find out where the greatest risks to your oral health lie. From there, we can put together the specifics of your plan to minimize that risk.

Here, then, is an overview of these 4 risk areas, and how to mitigate their effect on your oral health.

Teeth. Healthy teeth can endure for a lifetime. But tooth decay, a bacterial disease that erodes enamel and other dental tissues, can destroy a tooth's health and longevity. Our first priority is to prevent decay through daily brushing and flossing and regular dental cleanings. We also want to promptly treat any diagnosed decay with fillings or root canal therapy to limit any structural damage to an affected tooth.

Gums and bone. Teeth depend on the gums and bone for support and stability. But periodontal (gum) disease weakens and damages both of these supporting structures, and may lead to possible tooth loss. As with tooth decay, our highest priority is to prevent gum disease through daily hygiene and regular dental care. When it does occur, we want to aggressively treat it to stop the infection and minimize damage.

Bite function. Misaligned teeth and other bite problems can diminish oral health over time. A poor bite can impair oral function, leading to structural dental damage. Misaligned teeth are also harder to clean and maintain, which increases their risk for dental disease. Correcting these problems through orthodontics or bite adjustment measures can help alleviate these risks.

Appearance. How your smile looks may or may not be related to your mouth's health and function, but an unattractive smile can affect your emotional health, and thus worthy of consideration in your overall care plan. Improving appearance is often a mix of both cosmetic and therapeutic treatments, so treating a tooth or gum problem could also have a positive impact on your smile.

If you would like more information on long-term dental care strategies, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Successful Dental Treatment.”

StayonAlertforaDecayRepeatEvenAfteraRootCanal

A deeply decayed tooth is in serious trouble, and something a regular filling may not fix. You may instead need a root canal, a common tooth-saving procedure performed by general dentists or, in more difficult cases, endodontists (specialists in interior tooth treatment).

Regardless of who performs it, though, the basics are the same: The dentist accesses the tooth's decayed interior by drilling a hole and removing diseased tissue from the pulp and root canals through it. They then fill the empty spaces with a rubber-like substance before sealing the tooth and later crowning it to prevent re-infection.

For most, a root canal gives a decayed tooth a new lease on life that can last for years, if not decades. Occasionally, though, a root canaled tooth may become reinfected from tooth decay. There are a number of possible reasons for this unfortunate outcome.

For one, the decay might not have been caught until it had advanced into root canal filling, resulting in contamination. Although root canal treatment may still be effective, the chances of success are much lower than for a decayed tooth diagnosed before it had advanced this far.

Teeth with multiple roots or complex root canal networks are also difficult to treat. The challenge is to ensure all the root canals within the tooth have been thoroughly treated. These types of situations are usually best undertaken by an endodontist with microscopic equipment and advanced techniques that can better infiltrate intricate root canal networks.

These and other situations could make it more likely a root-canaled tooth is reinfected. Depending on the extent of damage, it may be best to extract the tooth and replace it with a dental implant or other restoration. But it's also possible to repeat the root canal—and the second time may be the charm.

As with many other dental conditions, the best outcome regarding a reinfected tooth after root canal is early detection and treatment. You can increase your chances of this with regular dental visits that include monitoring of any root-canaled teeth. You should also see your dentist as soon as possible if you notice pain or gum swelling associated with the tooth.

Root canals are highly effective at saving decayed teeth. But the rare reinfection is possible—so be on the alert.

If you would like more information on root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Root Canal Treatment: How Long Will It Last?

TakeItFromTaylorSwift-LosingYourOrthodonticRetainerisNoFun

For nearly two decades, singer-songwriter Taylor Swift has dominated the pop and country charts. In December she launched her ninth studio album, called evermore, and in January she delighted fans by releasing two bonus tracks. And although her immense fame earns her plenty of celebrity gossip coverage, she's managed to avoid scandals that plague other superstars. She did, however, run into a bit of trouble a few years ago—and there's video to prove it. It seems Taylor once had a bad habit of losing her orthodontic retainer on the road.

She's not alone! Anyone who's had to wear a retainer knows how easy it is to misplace one. No, you won't need rehab—although you might get a mild scolding from your dentist like Taylor did in her tongue-in-cheek YouTube video. You do, though, face a bigger problem if you don't replace it: Not wearing a retainer could undo all the time and effort it took to acquire that straight, beautiful smile. That's because the same natural mechanism that makes moving teeth orthodontically possible can also work in reverse once the braces or clear aligners are removed and no longer exerting pressure on the teeth. Without that pressure, the ligaments that hold your teeth in place can “remember” where the teeth were originally and gradually move them back.

A retainer prevents this by applying just enough pressure to keep or “retain” the teeth in their new position. And it's really not the end of the world if you lose or break your retainer. You can have it replaced with a new one, but that's an unwelcome, added expense.

You do have another option other than the removable (and easily misplaced) kind: a bonded retainer, a thin wire bonded to the back of the teeth. You can't lose it because it's always with you—fixed in place until the orthodontist removes it. And because it's hidden behind the teeth, no one but you and your orthodontist need to know you're wearing it—something you can't always say about a removable one.

Bonded retainers do have a few disadvantages. The wire can feel odd to your tongue and may take a little time to get used to it. It can make flossing difficult, which can increase the risk of dental disease. However, interdental floss picks can help here. ¬†And although you can't lose it, a bonded retainer can break if it encounters too much biting force—although that's rare.

Your choice of bonded or removable retainer depends mainly on your individual situation and what your orthodontist recommends. But, if losing a retainer is a concern, a bonded retainer may be the way to go. And take if from Taylor: It's better to keep your retainer than to lose it.

If you would like more information about protecting your smile after orthodontics, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Importance of Orthodontic Retainers.”





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